Classic John Price 5 MIDI Files

Unfortunately, since FM Synthesizers and wavebank technology have progressed since these songs were written, and since said technology varies from soundcard to soundcard, most of these don't sound as the were originally intended. So if you wonder "why on earth did they use that ungodly sounding instrument there?" the answer is probably that it sounded much better at the time. However, evenly perfectly reproduced, you'd probably still laugh at our compositions.

Dance2.mid
Not surprisingly, this was the second dance song we wrote. I'm not sure what happened to the first, which got everything started. We initially wrote these songs to make good on our claim that in a few hours we could write dance music as crappy as the stuff our female friends in highschool were listening to. This one has a lovely banjo solo by Tim.
Dance3.mid
At some point, all of these songs had names, but I've forgotten what they were. This one isn't actually a dance tune, but at the time we created the file, it was going to be. It's sort of a little guitar/bass interlude or something. Personally, I think it sucks a little less than the others.
Hmm2.mid
I was listening to a lot of Emerson, Lake, and Palmer when I started writing this one. Lots of excessive keyboard runs and whatnot. We weren't big on descriptive file names.
JP5-1
I think this one was called "JP5-1" because it was the first song we wrote after we came up with the name "The John Price 5" (which, incidentally, we did before the Ben Folds Five were well-known). It represents the height of our copy-and-paste musical efforts, save "JP5-2" (produced by Scott Crawford), which was sadly lost in a hard-drive failure.
Uncaglyn.mid
I think we wrote this before we began writing any of the other songs. It's our one "classical" piece, named after a Tuba player we once knew. There's quite a few in-jokes involved in it, and needless to say, we think it's hilarious. If I told you what the jokes were, you wouldn't find them funny.
 

 

  Last Modified 10/17/05 07:22

This page ©2004, John Price